Nov
01
2013
0

ignite Bay Area protein Dynamics

If you’re interested in protein dynamics and happen to be around the bay area you might want to attend iBAD or “ignite Bay Area protein Dynamics”. Featuring four 5 minute talks by:

  • Vijay Pande (Stanford)
  • Susan Marqusee (Berkeley)
  • Jacob Corn (Genentech)
  • Gira Bhabha (UCSF)

When: Nov. 5th 7pm (refreshments available before)

Where: UCSF mission bay campus – Byers Hall 212

See you there.

p.s. this event is sponsored by the protein society and hosted by the Fraser Lab.

 

Written by Nir London in: Events | Tags:
Oct
31
2013
0

Why did PAINS hit a nerve?

“CDD spotlight” recently interviewed prof. Jonathan Baell the author of the notorious PAINS paper.

PAINS or Pan Assay Interference Compounds, are a class of compounds that commonly show up in high throughput screens (HTS) for small molecule inhibitors (you can read more about them here , here  and here).

When asked why in his opinion this paper made such an impact, Baell gave an interesting answer: basically it really hit a nerve, and the timing was just right. According to Baell, their group lead some of the first academic HTS efforts, and stumbled upon these PAINS molecules again and again. By the time the paper was published, there were probably dozens of academic labs performing screens and it really resonated with them. Another possible reason for the wide acceptance of this work might have been ex-pharma people, turned academics, who knew these molecules from their past but could not talk about them. Baell mentions for instance that for Chris Lipinski “it was a breath of fresh air…”.

From a practical stand-point you can use this server from the Oprea group to filter your molecules and avoid future PAINS.

 

 

Written by Nir London in: Interviews | Tags: , , ,
Apr
29
2013
0

CAPRI 5th evaluation meeting

The CAPRI 5th evaluation meeting has just finished last week.

Unfortunately I couldn’t attend this year.

Fortunately, you can get the spirit of the meeting from this series of 3 blog posts over at Grid-Cast:

Combining and conquering at the CAPRI 5th evaluation meeting

Proteins by design – expanding on nature

Wrapping up at CAPRI – beers, bikes and brainstorming

The current CAPRI round is all about peptide docking! Exciting!

If anyone came back from the meeting please share your impressions.

Written by Nir London in: Events | Tags: , ,
Oct
21
2012
0

CASP10 conference

Critical Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction *CASP10* (an EMBO conference)
9-12 December 2012 | Gaeta, Italy

Every two years since 1994 CASP has conducted a community wide experiment to assess the state of the art in protein structure modeling.
The 2012 conference will report the results of 10th experiment and celebrate progress over almost 20 years of monitoring the field.

(more…)

Aug
29
2012
0

Two job openings at UCB coming soon!

Two computational structural biologist job openings will be opening soon at UCB. Check out the Jobs Board for more information.

Written by Xavier Ambroggio in: Jobs | Tags: , , , ,
Aug
27
2012
4

Does Organic Fluorine Accept Hydrogen Bonds?

Recently, as part of a structure based virtual screening campaign I’m undertaking, the following pose popped up as one of the highest ranking solutions:

Fluorine acts as an hydrogen bond acceptor in a predicted ligand pose

Fluorine acts as an hydrogen bond acceptor in a predicted ligand pose

Wow, that’s a nice looking fluorine-hydrogen bond (C-F···H-X) with that Asparagine, I thought to myself. But wait, can fluorine act as an hydrogen bond acceptor? A quick google scholar search came up with the following (very highly cited) paper: “Organic Fluorine Hardly Ever Accepts Hydrogen Bonds“. In this work Dunitz and Taylor analyze structural data from the PDB and CSD and show that only rarely is fluorine found in appropriate distance to accept a proton:  Out of 5947 C-F bonds (in 1218 crystal structures in the CSD), only 37  (0.6%) are involved in possible C-F···H-X  hydrogen  bonds. For comparison, corresponding figures for C=O and N(Ar) (e.g. in pyridine) groups are 42% and 32%.

What about protein-ligand structures though? It is those that are of most interest to us. Back at the day (1997) Dunitz found only 14 protein-fluorine containing ligand complexes in the PDB and claimed that in these too fluorine rarely acts as an acceptor.

Looking for a more recent analysis, I remembered the very useful “A Medicinal Chemist’s Guide to Molecular Interactions” by Bissantz, Kuhn and Stahl in which they also touch upon halogen hydrogen bonds in protein-ligand complexes. To my surprise however, they take a completely opposite stand on the subject:

“Interactions between CF and polar hydrogen atoms HX (where X = O, N) frequently occur in the PDB and CSD, even if such interactions cannot be classified as strong hydrogen bonds.(ref. to the above Dunitz’s paper) We have observed a thrombin inhibitor to change its binding mode upon fluorination of an aryl ring, such that a CF···HN interaction is formed.(Ref.) In another study on factor VIIa inhibitors, a fluorinated phenyl ring was shown to act as an isostere of a pyridine.(Ref.) An increase of affinity from 455 to 68 nM was observed in sitagliptin analogues binding to DPP-IV when going from 3,4-difluorinated to 2,4,5-trifluorinated triazolopiperazines.(Ref.) The additional ortho-F forms interactions at 3.2 Å distance with NH2 groups of Asn and Arg side chains (PDB code 1×70)”.

Add to this collection of anecdotes a recent pico-molar inhibitor of Cytochrome bc(1) in which a tri-fluro-methyl group contributed a large chunk of affinity and was later shown to make hydrogen bonds in the crystal structure.

So what is the take home message? Does fluorine act a proton acceptor? Is it only in the context of protein-ligand complexes that it is able to form hydrogen bonds? Will you pick a compound predicted to form such an interaction for experimental validation? If you have an opinion vote in the poll below! If you have a reason, explanation or reference please share in the comments.

Can fluorine contribute to ligand binding by accepting a hydrogen bond?

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Jack D. Dunitz, Robin Taylor (1997). Organic Fluorine Hardly Ever Accepts Hydrogen Bonds Chemistry – A European Journal DOI: 10.1002/chem.19970030115
Bissantz C, Kuhn B, & Stahl M (2010). A medicinal chemist’s guide to molecular interactions. Journal of medicinal chemistry, 53 (14), 5061-84 PMID: 20345171

Jun
25
2012
1
Jun
19
2012
2

Direct and selective small molecule activation of BAX

A virtual docking screen discovers a small molecule activator of the pro-apoptotic protein BAX. This novel approach could lead to a ‘new generation’ of apoptotic modulators that directly activate BCL-2 killer proteins. Moreover – it’s cool!

(more…)

Jun
09
2012
0

Algorythms In Structural Bioinformatics – winter school

We are pleased to announce a one-week school on Algorithms in Structural Bioinformatics. The aim is to introduce advanced methods in this domain, giving special attention to interdisciplinary approaches. The main focus will be on methodological developments meant to analyze and predict macromolecular assemblies, as well as on the corresponding software.

(more…)

Written by admin in: Events |
Apr
26
2012
0

Weekly literature review

A selection of this week’s interesting papers, brought to you via the Furman Lab

(more…)

Written by admin in: Literature Reviews,Title Madness |

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